When the Museum of Authenticity Annex neared completion at the beginning of this year, I began to search for the focus of an exhibit that could be installed there while the main building undergoes renovation. But the theme for the Museum’s first exhibit eluded me until one day I looked at a sculpture that has inhabited my living space in Denver since 1991. When she returned my gaze, I realized that she will always preside over the Museum, and the first exhibit should take her name: Dances in Two Worlds.

Sculptor Michael Mrowka (American) had already named the Janus totem when he delivered her to me directly following Denver’s Cherry Creek Arts Festival in July 1991. An assemblage of wooden foundry patterns, a cypress knee, and a round wooden base, “Dances in Two Worlds” presents two faces, one serene and the other distressed (or so it seems to me). Because a museum is a reflection of life, and life is rich in dualities, the “dances in two worlds” theme appealed to me. Once I had settled on that focus, I had no trouble selecting the components for the exhibit, which encompasses a range of artists, backgrounds, media, and subjects…