Exhibits

DANCES IN TWO WORLDS

JULY 2021–JANUARY 2022   exhibit highlights   —opaque watercolor paintings from the first half of the 20th century by Zuni and Diné artists depicting ceremonial life —lithographs and other prints from the first half of the 20th century by American and...

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GRAND OPENING EXHIBIT: SUM OF THE PARTS

GRAND OPENING EXHIBIT: SUM OF THE PARTS

OCTOBER 2020–JUNE 2021
In October 2020, after seven years of construction, the Museum of Authenticity’s main building was finally ready to occupy. Initially I had a different idea in mind for the first full-scale exhibit, but when I met and befriended assemblage artist Bernice Strawn—and purchased two of her smaller pieces, including “Enter Heaven Above”—I decided to begin with SUM OF THE PARTS and feature her constructions. Bernice is the matriarch of Salida’s art community. I am drawn to her personally—she is resourceful, spontaneous, and playful. And I am drawn to her work—it is imaginative, organic, dynamic, and spiritual.

The show also features three large installations by this prolific and revered artist: “Bridges,” “Shrine,” and “Temple.” Taken separately, the components of Bernice’s “Temple”—weathered piano pinblocks, barrel staves, and a curved aspen branch—do not convey the idea implied by the exhibit title, let alone the feelings even the suggestion of a temple might evoke. But then, the whole is greater than the sum of its parts.

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OPENING EXHIBIT: DANCES IN TWO WORLDS

OPENING EXHIBIT: DANCES IN TWO WORLDS

JUNE 2018–JUNE 2021
When the Museum of Authenticity Annex neared completion at the beginning of this year, I began to search for the focus of an exhibit that could be installed there while the main building undergoes renovation. But the theme for the Museum’s first exhibit eluded me until one day I looked at a sculpture that has inhabited my living space in Denver since 1991. When she returned my gaze, I realized that she will always preside over the Museum, and the first exhibit should take her name: Dances in Two Worlds.

Sculptor Michael Mrowka (American) had already named the Janus totem when he delivered her to me directly following Denver’s Cherry Creek Arts Festival in July 1991. An assemblage of wooden foundry patterns, a cypress knee, and a round wooden base, “Dances in Two Worlds” presents two faces, one serene and the other distressed (or so it seems to me). Because a museum is a reflection of life, and life is rich in dualities, the “dances in two worlds” theme appealed to me. Once I had settled on that focus, I had no trouble selecting the components for the exhibit, which encompasses a range of artists, backgrounds, media, and subjects…

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